Sequoias Community College District
District Police Department
 
Jeanne Clery
Annual Security Report
 
2014
(Covering years 2011, 2012, and 2013 
 
Who was Jeanne Clery?
Jeanne Clery was a 19-year-old Lehigh University freshman who was raped and murdered in her dorm room on April 5, 1986. Her parents later found out about 38 violent crimes on the Lehigh campus in the three years before her murder. They joined with other victims of campus crime and persuaded Congress to enact this law, which was originally known as the “Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990.”
The Clery Act:
In 1990, the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA) was amended to include the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 (Title II of Public Law 101- 542). This amendment required all postsecondary institutions participating in Title IV student financial aid programs to disclose campus crime statistics and security information. In 1998, the act was renamed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. This act is more commonly known as the “Clery Act”. The Clery Act requires colleges and universities to:
 
·         Collect, classify and count crime reports and statistics
·         Issue campus alerts
·         Publish an annual security report
·         Submit crime statistics to the Department of Education
·         Maintain a daily crime log
·         Disclose missing student notification procedures
·         Provide fire safety information
 
Sequoias Community College District Police Department publishes an annual Campus Security Report in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998 ("Clery Act"), 20 U.S.C. § 1092(f), Title 34 U.S. Code of Federal Regulations Section 668.46, and the California Education Code Sections 67380-67385. This report includes important information about safety and security policies implemented to protect the welfare of our campus community, as well as crime statistics for all of the campuses and centers within the District. You may view this report on the district website www.cos.edu. You may also request a copy of the report by contacting the District Police Department at 915 S. Mooney Blvd, Visalia CA 93277.
Crime Statistics for each campus within the Sequoias Community College District for calendar year 2013 may be viewed at the U.S. Department of Education, Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool at www.ope.ed.gov/security and at the end of this report.
 
 
Sequoias Community College District
The District’s College Campus, Center and learning sites are unique in size and location. 
·         College of the Sequoias sits on 65 acres just off of Highway 198 in central Visalia. This is or oldest site and houses our nursing and physical therapist training programs as well as general education classes.
·         The Hanford Learning Center is located on 13th Avenue, north of Lacy in the city of Hanford.  and houses educational classes as well as the Police and Fire Academies with a student population of
·         The Tulare Center is located on almost 500 acres which focusses on agricultural operations and general education with student enrollment at .
Total student population for 2013 was 14,033
The District Maintenance and Operations is responsible for the grounds, transportation, environmental health, safety, construction and lighting at the various learning centers.  The District Police work in close concert with the Maintenance and Operations division to promote the safety and welfare of the students, faculty and staff.  District Police officers patrol the campus and centers and will report malfunctioning lights or other unsafe physical conditions to Maintenance and Operations. In addition the District Safety Officer inspects each campus twice a year for lighting and hazard issues.
Non-residential buildings
Sequoias Community College District consists of 70 buildings with over 707,525 square feet of classroom and office space. The majority of these buildings can be accessed 24/7 by staff and faculty with a district issued FOB, (a personalized access device), or key. Many of these buildings automatically alarm at 11PM and remain in this state until automatically disarming at 6AM.
 It is imperative that faculty and staff work together to ensure District buildings are locked and the alarm system is armed each evening to prevent unauthorized entrance. Doors to buildings are not to be propped open, or left unlocked. Lost or stolen FOBs and/or keys should be reported to the employees Division Dean/Supervisor and the District Police Department as soon as possible.
Residential buildings
Sequoias Community College District has no residential housing facilities.
 
 
 
 
LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITY
 The District Police Department at Sequoias Community College District is empowered pursuant to section 830.32 (a) of the California Penal Code and Section 72330 of the California Education Code which fully subscribes to the standards of the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST).
The department is comprised of 5 fulltime sworn police officers who are armed and have the same authority under the law as municipal police officers. District police officers patrol the campuses seven days a week when students are present. They enforce applicable local, state, and federal laws; arrest violators; investigate and suppress crime; investigate traffic accidents; and provide a full range of police-related services, including immediate response to all medical and fire emergencies.
 
LAW ENFORCEMENT PARTNERSHIPS
Pursuant to California Education Code Section 67381, the District Police Department, Visalia Police Department, Tulare Police Department, Tulare County Sheriff’s Department and Hanford Police Department have adopted and signed written Memorandums of Understanding that clarifies and affixes operational responsibilities for the investigation of violent and non-violent crimes occurring on District property. Due to the sophisticated investigative resources required to properly investigate certain crimes, the District Police Department, by agreement, has arranged in certain circumstances for assistance from the above mentioned agencies. The agreement states that the District Police Department will be the primary reporting and investigating law enforcement agency for all crimes occurring on property owned and operated by Sequoias Community College District, with the exception of Class One cases of Homicide, Robbery, Kidnapping, Felony Assault, Auto Thefts, Sex Crimes and crimes against children.
In addition, the District Police Department seeks assistance from federal, state and city law enforcement agencies as needed.
 
Daily Crime Log
The District Police Department maintains a Daily Crime Log of all incidents reported to District Police. The Daily Crime Log is available for public inspection during hours of campus operations at the District Police headquarters and is available on the District Police webpage. Incidents will be posted and made available within two business days of receiving a report of an incident. District Police reserves the right to exclude reports from a log in certain circumstances as permitted by law.
 
 
 
PREPARING THE ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT
This annual security report is compiled and prepared by the District Police Department at Sequoias Community College District. Statistical information for activity that occurs off campus is retrieved from the Visalia Police Department, Tulare County Sheriff’s Department, Tulare Police Department, Hanford Police Department and various other jurisdiction which have satellite classes. For purposes of issuing timely warnings and the annual statistical disclosure required under Clery, the campus community should report all crimes to the District Police Department.
The District Police Department does not provide law enforcement services to off-campus residences or organizations. There are currently no fraternities or sororities located off-campus that are recognized by the Sequoias Community College District. Criminal activity occurring off-campus is monitored and recorded by the following agencies: Visalia Police Department, Tulare Police Department, Tulare County Sheriff’s Department and Hanford Police Department. Students involved in criminal activity off-campus may be contacted, cited or arrested by one of these agencies. During the preparation of the Annual Security Report, each of the above agencies is contacted and a good faith effort is made to obtain information as to crimes that are reportable under the Clery Act.
CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES
Who is a Campus Authority?
2012 Handbook: “Even at institutions with a police department on campus, a student who is a victim of a crime may be more inclined to report it to someone other than the campus police. For this reason, the Clery Act requires all institutions to collect crime reports from a variety of individuals and organizations that Clery considers to be campus security authorities”.
Who is a Campus Security Authority?
·         A campus police department or a campus security department of an institution
·         Local Police/Sheriff (Good Faith Request)
·         Any individual or individuals who have responsibility for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department (e.g., an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance into institutional property).
 
Although the reporting of criminal activity directly to the District Police Department is encouraged, crimes may also be reported to college officials who have significant responsibility for student and campus activities. The faculty and staff of Sequoias Community College District Police are trained to assist students in contacting (CSA’s) Campus Security Authorities in the event the student needs to report a crime. Campus Security Authorities (CSA) are responsible for forwarding non-identifying information to the District Police Department for inclusion in the annual security report, regardless of whether or not the victim chooses to file a report with law enforcement or press charges. As defined under the Clery Act, CSA’s include college deans and assistant deans, college directors, assistant directors, athletic team coaches, athletic assistant coaches, faculty advisors to student groups, and campus staff involved in disciplinary and judicial proceedings. Please be aware that information forwarded by CSA’s is for statistical purposes only.
PROFESSIONAL AND PASTORAL COUNSELORS
When acting in their official capacity, professional and pastoral counselors are not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics under 20 U.S.C. Section 1092(f). Professional and pastoral counselors are encouraged, if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures available for reporting crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the annual crime statistics. A “pastoral counselor” is a person who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling, and functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor. A “professional counselor” is a person whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling to members of the Sequoias Community College District and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.
 
Counseling Services Division
Although counselors typically have significant responsibility and involvement in student and campus activities, they are exempt from Clery reporting requirements. They are, however, contacted and encouraged to forward non-identifying information to the District Police Department on crimes that may be reported through their offices for inclusion in the annual security report.
Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)
CRISIS INTERVENTION TEAM (CIT)
The Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) of Sequoias Community College District is composed officers trained by Mental Health Professionals in Crisis Intervention.  In addition the District has professional counselors from Psychological Services and nurses from Health Services available to assist students. The CIT officers are available to assist when a student or staff member experiences a psychological emergency and is in need of immediate help.
What is a crisis?
A crisis is a life event that an individual perceives as stressful to the extent that normal coping mechanisms are insufficient. The CIT members have always been at the forefront of providing personal counseling, guidance, and referring students to the most appropriate resources available both on campus and off campus.
 
 
Call
Health Services 559-730-3880
District Police Department: 559-730-3999
What to do?
Follow these guidelines for handling difficult situations:
·         Trust your instincts
·         Be familiar with the student Code of Conduct. (College Catalog)
·         Do not hesitate to call District Police at (559) 730-3999.
·         If you think a student may be suicidal, DO NOT LEAVE THE STUDENT ALONE! You may be the critical link in assisting the student. Know that whatever the situation is, campus resources are available.
·         Listen to what the student is saying.
·         Assess the situation for unusual emotions, behavior, and thoughts.
 
VOLUNTARY/CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING
If you are the victim of a crime, we encourage you to file a crime report with the District Police Department. If you would like to maintain confidentiality and do not wish to pursue action within the college or criminal justice system, you are encouraged to consider filing a confidential report for purposes of inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. These types of reports can be made to the District Police Department. Individuals can do this by mail or by contacting a Campus Security Authority. You may also utilize the TipNow by emailing cos@tipnow. The information can enhance community safety by allowing the college to keep a more accurate record of crimes, helping to determine whether a pattern of crime exists and alerting the campus to potential danger.
 
SECURITY AND ACCESS TO DISTRICT FACILITIES
During business hours, District facilities are open to the community. During non-business hours, access to facilities throughout the District is restricted to those with issued keys, or to those admitted for unscheduled, and/or scheduled access through the District Police Department. Many of the buildings within the District utilize intrusion alarms, panic buttons and video cameras to enhance security in these areas.
 
TIMELY WARNING
Timely Warning
·         Scope: Narrow focus on Clery crimes.
·         Why: Timely warnings are triggered by crimes that have already occurred but represent an ongoing threat. Timely warnings are issued for any Clery crime committed within your Clery geography that is reported to your campus security authorities or a local law enforcement agency and is considered by the institution to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees.
·         Where: Applies to crimes that occur anywhere on your geographical locations.
·         When: Issue a warning as soon as the pertinent information is available. In the event of a situation which, in the judgment of the Chief of Police, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat of a criminal nature to the campus community, a timely warning will be issued by the District Police Department. Events that qualify for timely warnings include, but are not limited to, the following:
·         Burglary
·         Homicide
·         Motor Vehicle Theft
·         Arson
·         Hate Crimes
·         Manslaughter
·         Sex Offenses
·         Robbery
·         Aggravated Assault
·         Any crime considered to represent a threat to the public
 
The warning will be distributed utilizing one or more of the following systems
·         Campus e-mail (COS Enews)
·         Text message (TC Alert)
·         AlertUS
·         PurpleTree
·         Police Department website
·         Posted flyer
 
EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS
 
Emergency Notification
·         Scope: Wide focus on any significant emergency or dangerous situation (may include Clery crimes).
·         Why: Emergency notification is triggered by an event that is currently occurring on or imminently threatening the District facilities. Initiate emergency notification procedures for any significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees.
·         Where: Applies to situations that occur on District property.
·         When: Initiate procedures immediately upon confirmation that a dangerous situation or emergency exists or threatens.
·         Upon confirmation of a serious or emergency situation that poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of the campus community, a campus-wide notice will be disseminated, unless issuing a notification will, in the judgment of the responding authorities, compromise the efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency events that qualify for emergency notifications include, but are not limited to:
·         Outbreak of Meningitis, Norovirus, or other serious illness
·         Approaching tornado, hurricane or other extreme weather conditions
·         Earthquake
·         Gas leak
·         Terrorist incident
·         Active Shooter/Armed Intruder
·         Bomb Threat
·         Civil Unrest
·         Explosion
·         Nearby chemical or hazardous waste spill
·         Aircraft crash
·         Fire
The notification will be distributed as soon as possible under the following guidelines: Authority to activate a public notification will rest with the Chancellor/College President, Vice President, Chief of Police who may designate agents with the authority to activate a notification.
In situations when there is not time for consultation, a Police Officer or Dispatcher from the District Police Department may initiate a notification.
In matters of a criminal nature, the District Police Department will determine whether notifications are appropriate and necessary. The Chief of Police or designee will determine an incident’s extent and scope, and whether it meets the criteria for an emergency notification.
In matters not of a criminal nature, the campus department or District function that has jurisdiction will determine whether notifications are appropriate and necessary. When a campus department that has jurisdiction over an incident is not available to make a determination about notifications, the Chief of Police or designee may determine an incident’s extent and scope and whether it meets the criteria for an emergency notification.
Once requested by a designated authority, notifications will be made as soon as practicable. Notifications will generally be made by a police dispatcher, or designee who has been trained and is authorized to send notifications.
All messages should include the type of situation, the location of the situation, the time and date, instructions for the recipient and an additional method for the public to obtain information. One or more of the following systems will be used for sending notifications:
·         Campus e-mail
·         Public address system
·         Police Department website
·         AlertUs
·         TCAlert
·         Posted Flyers
 
EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES
The campus Emergency Operations Plan provides the framework for an organized response to various human-caused and natural emergency situations including fires, hazardous spills, earthquakes, flooding, explosion and civil disorders.
The college conducts tests of the emergency notification systems on campus monthly to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of the system.
 
CAMPUS SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTION EDUCATION
The District Police Department is available to conduct crime prevention presentations on a variety of topics. While the police department may offer advice and assistance regarding campus safety, all members of the campus community are encouraged to take responsibility for their own safety and, when possible, assist others. Members of the campus community are encouraged to report crimes or suspicious circumstances to the District Police Department.
 
Sexual Assault Prevention Program
Crime Prevention Programs on personal safety and theft prevention are sponsored by various campus organizations throughout the year. District Police Department personnel facilitate programs for student, parent, faculty and new employee orientations as well as student organizations. Police Department personnel are also available to provide educational strategies and tips on how students can protect themselves from sexual assaults, acquaintance rape, as well as other forcible and non-forcible sex offenses. The District Police Department is in the process of developing and implementing a women’s self-defense course called R.A.D, Rape Aggression Defense System to enhance the crime prevention training it offers in the area of sexual assault prevention. This is a comprehensive course that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-on defense training. Personnel from the police department will be required to attend an instructor course to certify them to teach these courses.
 
 
 
 
Reporting Suspected Misconduct
If those suspected of committing a crime are registered students, members of student organizations, or faculty/staff, you may, in addition to filing a police report; report the suspected misconduct for possible disciplinary action. To report suspected misconduct of a registered student, call the Office of the Dean of Student Services or the Title IX Coordinator (Dean of Human Resources).
 
 
 
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT
The Board of Trustees believes that all students have the right to be educated in a positive learning environment free from disruptions, harassment, bullying, and/or discrimination. Students shall be expected to exhibit appropriate conduct that does not infringe upon the rights of others or interfere with college programs or activities. The Superintendent/President shall establish Codes of Conduct and procedures for the imposition of discipline on students in accordance with the requirements for due process of the federal and state law and regulations.
The procedures shall clearly define the conduct that is subject to discipline and shall identify potential disciplinary actions including, but not limited to, the removal, suspension, or expulsion of a student.
The Board shall consider any recommendation from the Superintendent/President for expulsion. The Board shall consider an expulsion recommendation in closed session unless the student requests that the matter be considered in a public meeting. Final action by the Board on the expulsion shall be taken at a public meeting.
The procedures shall be made widely available to students through the college catalog and other means.
·         Causing, attempting to cause, or threatening to cause physical injury to another person.
·         Harassment or bullying of students or staff, including, but not limited to, cyberbullying, intimidation, hazing or initiation activity, extortion, or any other verbal, written, or physical conduct that causes or threatens to cause violence, bodily harm, or substantial disruption.
Cyberbullying includes the transmission of communications, posting of harassing messages, direct threats, or other harmful texts, sounds, or images on the Internet, social networking sites, or other digital technologies using a telephone, computer, or any wireless communication device. Cyberbullying also includes breaking into another person's electronic account and assuming that person's identity in order to damage that person's reputation.
Penal Code 653.2 makes it a crime for a person to distribute personal identity information electronically with the intent to cause harassment by a third party and to threaten a person's safety or that of his/her family (e.g., placing a person's picture or address online so that he/she receives harassing messages). In addition, Penal Code 288.2 makes it a crime to send a message to a minor if the message contains matter that is sexual in nature with the intent of seducing the minor (i.e., sexting).
 
·         Possession, sale or otherwise furnishing any firearm, knife, explosive or other dangerous object, including but not limited to any facsimile firearm, knife or explosive, unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the student has obtained written permission to possess the item from a district employee, which is concurred in by the college president.
·         Unlawful possession, use, sale, offer to sell, or furnishing, or being under the influence of, any controlled substance listed in Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 11053) of Division 10 of the California Health and Safety Code, an alcoholic beverage, or an intoxicant of any kind; or unlawful possession of, or offering, arranging or negotiating the sale of any drug paraphernalia, as defined in California Health and Safety Code Section 11014.5.
·         Committing or attempting to commit robbery or extortion, or gambling. Causing or attempting to cause damage to district property or to private property on campus.
·         Stealing or attempting to steal district property or private property on campus, or knowingly receiving stolen district property or private property on campus.
·         Willful or persistent smoking in any area where smoking has been prohibited by law or by regulation of the college or the district.
·         Committing sexual harassment as defined by law or by district policies and regulations.
·         Engaging in harassing or discriminatory behavior based on race, sex, (i.e., gender) religion, age, national origin, disability, or any other status protected by law.
·         Willful misconduct which results in injury or death to a student or to college personnel or which results in cutting, defacing, or other injury to any real or personal property owned by the district or on campus.
·         Disruptive behavior, willful disobedience, habitual profanity or vulgarity, or the open and persistent defiance of the authority of, or persistent abuse of, college personnel, including obstruction or disruption of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary regulations, or other college activities, including, but not limited to community service functions or other authorized activities on or off campus.
·         Cheating, plagiarism (including plagiarism in a student publication), or engaging in other academic dishonesty.
·         Dishonesty; forgery; alteration or misuse of college documents, records or identification; or knowingly furnishing false information to the district.
·         Unauthorized entry upon or use of college facilities.
·         Disorderly, lewd, indecent or obscene conduct on district-owned or controlled property, or at district-sponsored or supervised functions.
·         Engaging in expression which is obscene; libelous or slanderous; or which so incites students as to create a clear and present danger of the commission of unlawful acts on college premises, or the violation of lawful district administrative regulations, or the substantial disruption of the orderly operation of the district.
·         Persistent, serious misconduct where other means of correction have failed to bring about proper conduct.
·         Failure to comply with lawful directions of a district official performing his/her official duties.
·         Unauthorized preparation, giving, selling, transfer, distribution, or publication, for any commercial purpose, of any contemporaneous recording of an academic presentation in a classroom or equivalent site of instruction, including but not limited to digital or electronic recording or handwritten or typewritten class notes, except as permitted by any district policy or administrative regulation.
·         Other good cause as shown.
(Refer SCCD to Administrative Regulation 5500)
 
FIREARMS AND WEAPONS
The following are laws pertaining to firearms, weapons, or destructive devices on college property:
·         It is unlawful for any person to bring or possess any firearm (loaded or unloaded) upon the campus of, or buildings owned or operated for student teaching, research or administration by a public or private college (certain exceptions apply). California Penal Code Sections 626.9(h) & (i).
·         It is unlawful for any person to bring or possess any dirk, dagger, ice pick or knife having a fixed blade longer than 2.5 inches upon the grounds of, or within the California Community Colleges (certain exceptions apply). California Penal Code Section 626.10(b).
·         It is unlawful for any person, except in self-defense, to draw or exhibit an imitation firearm, “BB” device, toy gun or a replica of a firearm in a threatening manner against another in such a way as to cause a reasonable person apprehension or fear of bodily harm. California Penal Code Section 417.
·         It is unlawful for any person to bring or possess a less than lethal weapon as defined in California Penal Code Section 16780, or stun gun as defined in California Penal Code Section 17230, upon the grounds of or within a public or private college (certain exceptions apply. California Penal Code Section 626.10 (i).
·         It is unlawful for any person to possess for any reason any explosives, pipe bomb, grenade, destructive device or dry ice bomb. California Penal Code Section 18710.
·         It is unlawful for any person to possess any type of cane gun, wallet gun, any undetectable or camouflaged firearm, ballistic knife, belt buckle knife, leaded can, zip gun, lipstick case knife, air gauge knife, writing pen knife, practice hand grenade, billy club, sand club, sap, metal or composite knuckles, shuriken, nunchaku, or blackjack. California Penal Code Sections, 19200(b), 20310, 20410, 20610, 20910, 21110, 21710, 21810, 22010, 22210, 22410, 24310, 24410, 24710 and 33600.
 
MISSING PERSONS
If a member of the college community has reason to believe that a student who attends at Sequoias Community College District is missing, he or she should immediately notify the District Police Department at (559) 730-3999. The District Police Department will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation. Should the police department determine that the student is missing; notifications will be made to the following within twenty-four hours of the determination:
·         The student’s designated confidential contact
·         The student’s parent or legal guardian, if under the age of eighteen and not emancipated
·         Surrounding law enforcement agencies
In addition to the notifications mentioned above, once an investigation is launched, it may include contacting any or all of the following:
·         The student’s parents
·         The law enforcement agency that has jurisdiction where the student’s permanent residence is located
·         Law enforcement agencies along a route where the student may have likely traveled
·         Any other person or entity that may have information as to the whereabouts of the missing student
 


 
 
SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY, SANCTIONS, & LAWS
In accordance with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, the following information is provided regarding District and campus policies prohibiting unlawful possession, use or distribution of drugs or alcohol; District and campus sanctions regarding drug and alcohol violations by students or employees; federal, state, and local laws and penalties for drug and alcohol offenses; health effects of drug and alcohol abuse; and local resources providing assistance for drug and alcohol abuse (counseling, rehabilitation, or re-entry programs).
 
District Policy & Sanctions
The District strives to maintain communities and workplaces free from the illegal use, possession, or distribution of alcohol and other drugs. Manufacture, sale, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of alcohol and controlled substances by District students and employees on District properties, at official District functions, or on District business is prohibited except as permitted by law, District policy and campus regulations. Students violating these policies are subject to disciplinary action, including suspension or dismissal from the District, and may be referred for criminal prosecution and/or required to participate in appropriate treatment programs. Employees violating these policies may be subject to corrective action, including dismissal, under applicable District policies and labor contracts, and may be referred for criminal prosecution and/or required to participate in an Employee Support Program or appropriate treatment program.
 
Federal Laws & Sanctions:
Under federal law, it is a felony offense to sell or intend to sell, manufacture, or distribute Schedule I and II illicit drugs or mixtures containing them (e.g. cocaine, methamphetamines, heroin, Ecstasy, GHB, Ketamine, LSD, PCP, and so-called "designer drugs", as well as "counterfeits" purported to be such drugs), or to traffic in marijuana or hashish.
Depending upon the quantity of drugs involved, penalties for first offenses range from 5 years to life (20 years to life if death or serious injury involved) and fines up to $10 million or more, and for second offenses from 10 years to life (life if death or serious injury involved) and fines up to $20 million. Illegal trafficking in over-the-counter or prescription drugs (including anabolic steroids) have maximum terms of 5 years for first offenses and 10 years for second offenses, and heavy fines. Illegal possession of controlled substances can trigger federal prison sentences and fines up to $100,000 for first offenses, more for second offenses. Those convicted of possession or distribution of controlled substances can be barred from receiving benefits of federal programs, including student grants and loans, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses; may be subject to forfeiture of property used in or traceable to illegal controlled substance transactions.
 
California Laws & Sanctions:
California law prohibits furnishing and selling alcoholic beverages to underage (younger than 21) or obviously intoxicated individuals. Underage persons may not buy alcoholic beverages or possess them on campus, in public, or in places open to public view; the penalties for violations of these laws may include substantial fines and jail.
Alcohol may not be sold without a license or permit.
State law also prohibits driving a motor vehicle under the influence, a blood alcohol level of .08 percent or higher creates a presumption of intoxication, but can be charged with lower blood alcohol levels, drinking or possessing an open container of alcohol while driving and operating a bicycle while intoxicated.
Driving while under the influence penalties include jail or prison, fines of $1,000 or more, driver's license suspension or revocation, and required drug/alcohol treatment programs. Refusing to submit to a test for blood alcohol can result in suspension of driver's license for up to 3 years.
Sale or possession for sale of controlled substances such as cocaine, methamphetamines, heroin, Ecstasy, GHB, Ketamine, LSD, PCP, marijuana, and "designer drugs" is a felony with terms of 7 years or more; manufacture results in terms of 20 years or more; possession alone is punishable by up to 7 years in prison.
Sentences are enhanced for previously convicted felons, for distribution within 1,000 feet of a school or District campus or within 100 feet of a recreational facility, and for distribution to a pregnant woman or to someone under 18 by one over 18. Property used in drug transactions can be seized.
 
SUBSTANCE ABUSE EDUCATION and PREVENTION PROGRAMS, ASSISTANCE
SERVICES and RESOURCES
Kings County
Champions Recovery Alternatives
700 N Irwin, Hanford
583-9300
Full Service Partnership
400 Kings County
Drive Suite 104, Hanford
852-2333
Hannah’s House
222 W Keith, Hanford
583-7800
Kingsview Substance Abuse Treatment Center
1393 Bailey Drive, Hanford
582-4481
 
 
Tulare County
Kaweah Delta Mental Health Hospital
1100 South Akers, Visalia
624-3300
Pine Recovery Center
120 W School, Visalia
625-4100
Tulare County Alcoholism Council
120 W School, Visalia
625-2995
New Visions
1425 E Walnut, Visalia
625-4072
Visalia First Assembly Chemical Dependant Group
3737 W Walnut, Visalia
737-9600
Kingsview Substance Abuse Program
Tulare, Ca
688-7531
El Primo Paso
1350 S Crowe, Visalia
734-6042
 
 
Victory Outreach
1200 N Cain, Visalia
635-3377
Alternative Service Tulare
213 E Kern, Tulare
685-8283
Alternative Service Visalia
2223 N Shirk, Visalia
651-8090
Hope for Women
132 n Valley, Visalia
737-4660
Turning Point
220 N Locust, Visalia
627-1385
 
 
 
 
SEXUAL ASSAULT RESPONSE
Sequoias Community College District does not tolerate sex offenses in any form, including sexual assault, sexual misconduct, harassment, exploitation, or intimidation. Reports of sex offenses may be made to the District Police Department, Dean of Student Services, the Health Center and Psychological Services.
 
Persons who believe that they have been sexually assaulted or were the object of any sex offense should immediately contact District Police, either by telephone (559-730-3999) or in person, to initiate a crime report.
 
The preservation of criminal evidence is essential to the successful prosecution of a sex offense. Therefore it is essential that in cases of sexual assault, District Police should be contacted as soon as possible. Staff counselors are available to assist and to accompany the victim of a sex offense from the initial report to the final resolution of the case.
 
If you do not wish to make a report to the police, you are still encouraged to seek professional medical advice. (Please note that all health-care providers are legally required to report all cases of suspected sexual or physical assault to law enforcement).
Students and employees of Sequoias Community College District suspected of committing a sex offense of any kind are subject to criminal prosecution in addition to disciplinary action under District policies, regulations and collective bargaining agreements. Campus disciplinary action can be initiated even if criminal charges are not pursued.
 
In addition to criminal prosecution, complaints against students accused of sexual battery, attempted rape, rape, or other sex offenses will be processed in accordance with the procedures in the student Code of Conduct. The accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a campus disciplinary proceeding, and both shall be informed of the outcome of any campus disciplinary proceeding brought forth alleging a sex offense.
 
Sex offenses can be addressed both through college administrative procedures and through the criminal justice system. Any criminal proceeding is entirely separate from administrative proceedings of the college In addition, students have the option of changing their academic situations after an alleged sexual assault, if such changes are reasonably available.
 
The college will disclose to an alleged victim of a crime of violence (as defined under United States Code Title 18, Section 16) or a non-forcible sex offense the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the alleged crime, the next of kin shall be treated as the alleged victim for this purpose Victims of sexual assault are strongly encouraged to take the following actions:
 
Get to a safe place as soon as possible
·         Call the police by dialing 9-1-1
·         To preserve evidence that will be helpful in prosecution, do not eat, drink, wash, shower, go to the bathroom, douche, or clean up prior to a medical exam.
 
WHO TO CONTACT FOR FURTHER ASSISTANCE
 
Tulare County Rape Crisis Center
815 W Oak Ave
Visalia, CA
(559) 732-7371
 
 
Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
24 Hour Crisis Line – 1-877-727-3225
 
 
 
SEX OFFENDER REGISTRATION INFORMATION
 
The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act requires institutions of higher learning to issue a statement in their annual security report detailing where members of their campus community can obtain information concerning registered sex offenders. It also requires sex offenders who are required to register under state law, to provide notice of their enrollment or employment at any institution of higher learning in the state where he/she resides. In addition, California law requires sex offenders who attend a campus, and all campus affiliated sex offenders, to register with campus law enforcement. Members of the public may access sexual offender information at the Megan’s Law website maintained by the Department of Justice: www.meganslaw.ca.gov.
 
 
 
SOURCES FOR CRIME STATISTICS
This report contains crime statistics compiled for the 2012 calendar year, plus the previous two calendar years. The information was compiled from reports received by the District Police Department.
Crime Statistics
Under the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statists Act, the campuses of Sequoias Community College District annually report statistics on occurrences of the following offenses to the U.S. Department of Education.
• Homicide
• Manslaughter
• Robbery
• Aggravated Assault
• Sex offenses (Forcible and non-forcible)
• Burglary
• Motor vehicle theft
• Arson
• Hate Crimes
Statistics for the above mentioned offenses are made available through the Department of Education’s Office of Post-Secondary Education. Statistics are available on-line at: http://ope.ed.gov/security/.
 
OFFENSE DEFINITIONS
 
Per the Clery Act, crimes are classified based on the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook (UCR). For sex offenses only, the definitions used are from the FBI’s National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) edition of the UCR. Hate crimes are classified according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Hate Crime Data Collection Guidelines and Training Guide for Hate Crime Data Collection. Although the law states that institutions must use the UCR for defining and classifying crimes, it does not require Clery Act crime reporting to meet all UCR standards.
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter: the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.
Negligent Manslaughter: the killing of another person through gross negligence.
Sex Offenses, Forcible: any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent. There are four types of forcible sex offenses:
 
·         Forcible Rape is the carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity (or because of his/her youth). This offense includes the forcible rape of both males and females.
 
·         Forcible Sodomy is oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/ her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.
 
·         Sexual Assault with an object is the use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. An object or instrument is anything used by the offender other than the offender’s genitalia. Examples are a finger, bottle, handgun, stick, etc.
 
·         Forcible Fondling is the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or, not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/ her temporary or permanent mental incapacity. Forcible fondling includes “indecent liberties” and “child molesting.”
 
 
Sex Offenses, Non-forcible are incidents of unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse. Only two types of offenses are included in this definition:
 
·         Incest is non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
 
·         Statutory Rape is non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. If force was used or threatened, or the victim was incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth, or temporary or permanent mental impairment, the offense should be classified as forcible rape, not statutory rape.
 
Stalking: A repeated course of conduct directed at a specific person (when based on gender) that places that person in reasonable fear for his/her or others’ safety, or causes the person to suffer substantial emotional distress.
 
Domestic Violence: Any act of violence committed against someone who is a current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, someone with whom the abuser has a child, someone with whom the abuser has or had a dating or engagement relationship.
 
Dating Violence: Abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social or dating relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. This may include someone the victim just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website.
 
Robbery: the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
 
Aggravated Assault: an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury.
This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.
Burglary: the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. The UCR classifies offenses locally known as Burglary (any degree); unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts at these offenses as Burglary.
 
Motor Vehicle Theft: the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.
 
Arson: any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
 
Hate Crimes: any of the aforementioned offenses, larceny, simple assault, intimidation and vandalism reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s bias. Categories of bias are:
 
·         Race. A preformed negative attitude toward a group of persons who possess common physical characteristics (color of skin, eyes, and/or hair; facial features, etc.) genetically transmitted by descent and heredity which distinguish them as a distinct division of humankind (Asians, blacks, whites).
 
·         Gender. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons because those persons are male or female. Gender bias is also a Clery Act-specific term, not found in the FBI’s Hate Crime Data Collection Guidelines.
 
·         Religion. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons who share the same religious beliefs regarding the origin and purpose of the universe and the existence or nonexistence of a supreme being (Catholics, Jews, Protestants, atheists).
 
·         Sexual orientation. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their sexual attraction toward, and responsiveness to, members of their own sex or members of the opposite sex (gays, lesbians, heterosexuals).
 
·         Ethnicity/national origin. A preformed negative opinion, or attitude, toward a group of persons of the same race or national origin who share common or similar traits, languages, customs and traditions (Arabs, Hispanics).
 
·         Disability. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their physical or mental impairments/challenges, whether such disability is temporary or permanent, congenital or acquired, accident, by heredity, accident, injury, advanced age or illness.
 
Liquor Law Violations: the violation of state or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages, not including driving under the influence and drunkenness.
 
Drug Law Violations: the violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use; the unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation or importation of any controlled drug or narcotic substance.
 
Weapons Law Violations: the violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices or other deadly weapons.
 
 
 
GEOGRAPHIC DEFINITIONS
 
ON CAMPUS
 Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes.
Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to paragraph (1) of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).
 
NON-CAMPUS BUILDING OR PROPERTY
Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.
 
PUBLIC PROPERTY
All public property (including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities) that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
 
 
 
 
 
Crime Statistics (Visalia Campus)
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Crimes
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
Murder
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Manslaughter
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Forcible Sex Offenses
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Non-Force Sex Offenses
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Robbery
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Aggravated Assault
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Burglary
1
3
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
5
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
Arson
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Stalking
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Domestic Violence
 
 
2
 
 
0
 
 
0
Dating Violence
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Arrest
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
Liquor Law Violations
6
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Violations
3
1
5
1
1
1
0
0
0
Weapons Violations
0
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
Total Arrest
9
2
7
2
2
3
0
0
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property    1
Non-Campus     2
Disciplinary Referrals
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
Liquor Law Violations
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Weapons Violations
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total Referrals
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property    1
Non-Campus     2
Hate Crimes
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
All Hate Crimes Specified Above
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
 
Stalking, Domestic Violence, and Dating Violence were not required reportable statistic until 2013
Crime Statistics (Hanford Cite)
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Crimes
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
Murder
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Manslaughter
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Forcible Sex Offenses
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Non-Force Sex Offenses
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Robbery
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Aggravated Assault
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Burglary
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Arson
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Stalking
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Domestic Violence
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Dating Violence
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Arrest
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Weapons Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total Arrest
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Disciplinary Referrals
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Drug Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Weapons Violations
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total Referrals
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Hate Crimes
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
2011
2012
2013
All Hate Crimes Specified Above
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
 
Stalking, Domestic Violence, and Dating Violence were not required reportable statistic until 2013
Crime Statistics (Tulare Center)
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Crimes
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
Murder
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Manslaughter
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Forcible Sex Offenses
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Non-Force Sex Offenses
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Robbery
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Aggravated Assault
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Burglary
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Arson
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Stalking
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Domestic Violence
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Dating Violence
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Arrest
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
Liquor Law Violations
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Drug Violations
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Weapons Violations
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Total Arrest
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Disciplinary Referrals
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
Liquor Law Violations
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Drug Violations
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Weapons Violations
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Total Referrals
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
On Campus
Public Property   
Non-Campus    
Hate Crimes
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
2010
2011
2012
All Hate Crimes Specified Above
 
 
0
 
 
0
 
 
0
Tulare Center not a reportable cite until 2013
Stalking, Domestic Violence, and Dating Violence were not required reportable
 
 
 
 
 
Last Updated: 9/30/2014 4:24 PM